Posts Tagged “SXVF-M25C”

Noel reprocessed the Veil nebula data making the stars less obtrusive and sharpening up the nebulosity a little to emphasize the filaments.  It’s a personal choice as to which version you prefer – I like the down-played stars myself.

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Today is a landmark day for the New Forest Observatory.  After a marathon processing session involving a lot of blood, sweat, tears, and a hallucination-inducing lack of sleep – Noel Carboni has just finished processing the Summer 2007 mega-project, the Veil nebula in Cygnus!

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The accompanying image shows the Rosette nebula in the infrared (720nm – 1,000nm) part of the spectrum.  The image is composed of 7 subs at 1600 seconds per sub, just over 3-hours total exposure time – and – there’s virtually nothing there!  You can just about make out some of the core region of the Rosette, and that’s about it.  Amazing that there is so little near infrared emission from this object when I got plenty from another HII region – M42 in Orion.

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The constellation Cancer is quite well placed during March, and Cancer contains a couple of very nice open clusters that make excellent imaging objects, namely M44 the Beehive cluster or Praesepe or NGC2632, and M67 [NGC2682] which doesn’t seem to have a “popular” name.

For the March imaging object of the month I shall choose M44 which lies at a distance of 515 light years. Read the rest of this entry »

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Noel is getting all the data prepared for the coffee-table book and is now mopping up stuff from last year.  Here we have an updated image of M31.
The basis of this image was actually first light for the M25C way back on Fri 22nd September 2006!  Five and a half hours of RGB using 4-minute subs, and Noel having to work enormous magic to get the right colour as the firmware hex file was not correct for the M25C at the time!!!
We then go to 2007 for, Wed 3rd Oct 2007, 2 hours using 20-minute subs H-alpha – Sat 6th Oct 2007, 2.5 hours 450 second subs RGB –  Wed 17th Oct 2007, 4 hours 35 minutes using 750 second subs RGB – and finally Fri 2nd November 2007, 6 hours and 12 minutes using 6-minute subs RGB.  Grand total 20 hours 47 minutes.  Obsessive?  Moi?

Noel has just informed me that I missed one session out!  On Thursday 15th November 2007 I also captured 5 hours and 20-minutes of H-alpha data using 20-minute subs.  That now brings the running total to just 7-minutes over 26 hours!!!

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The fourth image in the 6-night marathon is M78 and part of Barnard’s Loop in Orion.  This is a work in progress as so far this is only 4 hours of RGB data using 15-minute subs – and with an intrusive Moon.  Noel’s expert processing has already created quite a nice image, but we need more data, and I need to move the whole frame to the right to get more of Barnard’s Loop in the FOV.

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The third image from the 6-night session is the first single-star image I have taken with the Sky 90/SXVF-M25C combination.  This is Procyon – and the image comprises 48 sub-exposures at 5-minutes per sub or exactly 4 hours total exposure time.

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The second image from the 6-night marathon session this month is a nice pair of open clusters in Gemini – M35 and NGC2158.  This image comprises 39 sub-exposures at 6-minutes per sub or just 6-minutes short of 4-hours in total.

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We have just had six clear nights in a row – which for me personally is an all-time record!  Got a few reasonable images during this period, unfortunately last couple of days had the Moon intruding, but we can’t have everything 🙂

This first image is the Owl nebula [M97] a planetary nebula, and nearby galaxy M108, both in Ursa Major.  This is an RGB image comprising 11 subs at 15 minutes per sub giving a total of 2 hours and forty five minutes.

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Just when you thought it couldn’t get any better, Noel Carboni revisited the original data and reprocessed the Rosette from scratch.  You can see from the attached image that he has squeezed the last ounce out of this one.  I think we can safely tick this one off the list now 🙂

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