Archive for April, 2014

In putting together the next book “Experimental Photography” I came across some unprocessed data from a while back.  It was Carbon star V623 Cassiopeiae or SAO23858 – a very nice Carbon star lying just below Pazmino’s cluster in the constellation Cassiopeia.

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So today’s APOD describes Spica as bright bluish.  Well you’re slowly getting there guys, eventually you’ll cotton on.  If you check out the negativity of the B-V index you’ll find that Spica is in fact the 3rd bluest star in the entire sky after Zeta Puppis and S Monocerotis – it is actually the brightest star of all 3.  So Spica is the brightest (very) blue star up there.  Maybe you’ll get it right 3rd time around?  Have you actually even seen Spica through binoculars or a low power telescope?  You can’t have I guess as it looks like a celestial sapphire blazing away with a deep blue hue.

 

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Today’s APOD is a nice Mars, Ceres, Vesta image, but the words to go with the image are a bit of a let down.

We read – “Clearly outshining bluish Spica ………..” – BLUISH SPICA!!  The brightest blue star in the night sky?  Get a grip guys.

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First the positive.  90 pages of the new book completed, estimated total 250 pages.

Now the negative.  All my (5) observatory computers are XP-based machines as there are still plenty of astronomy bits running on ancient software.  As you know Microsoft no longer supports XP, this is apparently no problem for the 4 Intel machines – but a big problem for the Athlon which has now kindly locked me out.  Thank you very much Microsoft – like I need these unnecessary problems on top of trying to maintain a parallel imaging array.

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My recent Mars & Spica DSLR image made today’s Earth Science Picture of the Day (EPOD).

Thank you Jim for publishing my work 🙂

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