I am in the final stages of setting up a new imaging system based on a Canon 200mm prime lens with M25C OSC imager and a 52 mm IDAS filter on the front of the lens giving me f#3.85 and spikeless images :)  As it is that time of the year an obvious target for testing out the star imaging qualities of the rig is the Double Cluster.  With a horrendous sampling of 7.97 arcseconds per pixel it makes you wonder how it can even resolve stars – but clearly it does :)  Above the Double Cluster we see the rarely images Stock 2 open cluster, which looks like a stick man on his side.  And at the very top/left you can just see the edges of the Heart & Soul nebulae.

Only 16 x 5-minute subs for this one, and very misty conditions too, a LOT of water vapour in the air – however, as a bonus, there was no Moon.

I think this is going to make a good rig for those BIG winter nebulae.  It is NOT a good rig for those single bright star shots as there are terrible ghost flares from very bright stars, probably resulting from all that glass in the 200mm lens.  Well you can’t have it all I guess.

Comments No Comments »

I have now removed the Canon 5D MkII from the 200mm lens in the south dome and replaced it with the M25C that used to be on the Hyperstar.

The massive field of view afforded by the 5D MkII on the 200mm lens is truly addictive – but the lack of red sensitivity of an un-modified DSLR and the lack of Peltier cooling drove me to put the M25C back on.

So – a whole Cassiopeia mosaic instead of being a 4-framer with the 5D MkII is now a 6-framer, or very comfortable 9-framer.  The price you pay I guess.

 

Comments No Comments »

Put the 5D MkII on the back of a TS80 refractor together with a 5X Barlow (not really called a Barlow then, but the name sticks).

Took 17 subs at 1/200th second and ISO800 which I stacked in Maxim.  This is the result.

See in higher resolution here https://flic.kr/p/oSq5uA

Comments No Comments »

Only 4 x 10-minute subs at ISO 800 from last night – but – I was amazed at how bright the blue-green parts of the Veil came out (and not at all surprised at the lack of red :( )

The whole of the Veil nebula easily covered and a nice open cluster NGC6940 thrown in as well.

AS I mentioned a while back, and this image confirms it, it has got to be worth putting an OIII filter on the front, going for much deeper subs, and using the massive FOV of this combo to scan for planetaries.

Comments No Comments »

Managed to capture a few 5-minute subs of comet Jacques when it was close to Epsilon Cassiopeiae on the evening of 22nd August 2014.

Comments No Comments »

Last night was one of those very rare nights.  Completely clear, Moonless, and the Milky Way like I’ve never seen it before from here – magic.

Put the 200mm lens and M26C onto Kemble’s Cascade.  31 subs at 5-minutes per sub, all subs good :)

The smudge on the bottom of the image (which I initially processed out) is in fact a planetary nebula.

Comments No Comments »

Here is a Noel Carboni process of the recent Delphinus data taken from the New Forest Observatory.

Comments No Comments »

The Canon 5D MkII/Canon 200mm prime lens combo gives a field of view that can grab the whole of the constellation Delphinus in one go!
I started imaging around 11:15 p.m. on 02/08/2014 and finally packed up at 2:00 a.m. on 03/08/2014. As I was coming indoors I saw the Pleiades low down in the NE, winter is not far away.
The data for this Delphinus image comprises 26 x 4-minute subs at ISO400 and f#4. Lodestar guiding with everything piggy-backed on a C11.

Comments No Comments »

Noel Carboni produced a stretched version of the Altair data to better show Barnard’s “E”.

Comments No Comments »

Altair (centre), Tarazed (with Barnard’s “E”) top and Alshain (bottom) – the main stars in Aquila. Imaged using the Canon 5D MkII and the Canon 200mm prime lens at f#4. ISO 400, 4-minute subs, 24 subs in total – 22/07/2014. Expertly processed by Noel Carboni.

Comments No Comments »