Archive for the “IOM” Category

Imaging Object of the Month

Going back to 28th September we had the most amazing total Lunar eclipse, this image captured using a Canon 5D MkII on a TS80 triplet at f#6 all sitting on a tripod, shows pre-totality, totality, and post totality.  And yes it really was VERY red :)

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As it is the first of the month today – it is a good day to resurrect the Deep-Sky Image of the Month :)

Just taken recently, I have chosen the Sky 90/M26C 4-framer of Kemble’s Cascade taken just a few days ago.  As I mentioned in the original post – I have wanted this FOV for something like 8-years, but it is only with the Mega-WASP array that it has now become possible to do a 4-framer in a single evening.  Expect a lot more of these large field views in the coming months :)

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I feel in such a good mood having just completed the mega-WASP upgrade that I think I will resurrect the almost forgotten Image of the Month :)

Here is the very recent Polaris image taken with the mini-WASP array – 36 x 5-minute subs using all 3 Sky 90s with (non Trius) M26C OSC CCDs.

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This month’s image is a wide-field taken using the amazing Canon EF200 f#2.8 prime lens and a Canon 5D MkII DSLR.  Piggy-back mounted on the C11 I took 10 x 5-minute subs at ISO 400 and f#4 with an IDAS filter attached to the EF200.  As expected the Heart and Soul nebulae didn’t come out too well with the un-modified 5D MkII, but I am very pleased indeed with the nice round stars from corner to corner over a 10 x 6.8 degree field of view – something well beyond the capabilities of my refractors.  Looks like I will be using this rig for star fields and reasonably high resolution constellation shots.

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I see the Image of the Month didn’t pop up a couple of days back.  Either I didn’t do one or it’s lost in cyberspace.  Never mind, here’s one a couple of days late.  This is the recent M11 in the Scutum star cloud image taken a couple of months back using the mini-WASP array.  This is rapidly becoming my favourite image, mainly due to all those stars :)

 

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For this DSS2 image of the Tulip nebula region in Cygnus I just kept adding frames until the computer gave up :)

 

 

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This is a 5-frame mosaic put together using Noel Carboni’s Astronomy Tools for Photoshop and DSS2 red and blue channel data.  I seriously question why I bother to image when such high quality data is readily available to download and process into a such a stunning RGB image.

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Yes – another single star picture for this month’s Image of the Month.  Polaris, the Pole star, the North star, Alpha Ursa Minor – the Navigator’s friend.  I like this region of space because 1)  It is rarely imaged and 2)  It is difficult to take deep images in this region due to the vagaries of the good old GEM.  Quite a few faint fuzzies in the background of this one, and many of them are closer to the Pole than well-known Polarissima Borealis.  The green cross-hairs at the 2 O’clock position from Polaris indicate the position of the North Celestial Pole, as you can see, it’s actually quite some way from Polaris.  Finally, yes, if you think you can see some “cloud” in there – this is a touch of the Integrated Flux Nebula (IFN).

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The Image of the Month for May 2013 is the recent reprocess of the Coathanger Cluster (Al Sufi’s cluster, Collinder 399) in the constellation Vulpecula.  This reprocess by Noel Carboni included data from the mini-WASP array plus deep data from the Hyperstar III.  To the left of the cluster we see the sparkling little open cluster NGC 6802, which reminds me a lot of little NGC 1502 sitting at the end of Kemble’s cascade.  This image of the Coathanger represents around 8-hours of total imaging time using OSC cameras M25C and M26C.  I like the Milky Way background and the prominent dark patches in this image.

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The image of the month for April 2013 is the stunning red star Mu Cephei.  As you know, I really like the impact the bright single star images have, especially when the single star is something very special.

Mu Cephei is also known as Herschel’s Garnet star – it is a red supergiant in Cepheus and is one of the largest and most luminous stars in the whole of our galaxy!

Mu Cephei is approximately 1000 times larger than our Sun’s solar radius, and if it were placed in the Sun’s position, it would reach between the orbit of Jupiter and Saturn.

Mu Cephei’s apparent brightness varies without recognizable pattern between magnitude +3.62 and +5 in a period of 2 to 2.5 years. Mu Cephei is visually nearly 100,000 times brighter than the Sun, with an absolute visible magnitude of Mv = −7.6. Combining its absolute visible brightness, its infrared radiation, and correcting for interstellar extinction gives a luminosity of around 350,000 solar luminosities, making it one of the most luminous stars known.

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