Archive for the “Sky 90 and SXV-H9C” Category

The same final process twiddles carried out on the Registar composite image of the Monkey Head nebula :)

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Registar was used to align old Rosette and Monkey Head nebula data with that taken recently to form a composite image with even more data :)  Here are the results.

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We didn’t even know about this!  Earth Science Picture of the Day (EPOD) have chosen our image of the reflection nebulosity within the emission nebula in Cygnus.  Here is what EPOD have to say:

The constellation of Cygnus the Swan, also referred to as the Northern Cross, is now nearly overhead for viewers in the Northern Hemisphere around 8:00 p.m. The stars composing Cygnus reside along the spine of our galaxy — the Milky Way. Surrounding the central star in Cygnus, Sadr (upper left center), is the massive emission nebula IC1318 (in red), also called the Gamma Cygni nebulosity. A sea of just the color red can be boring to the eye, but here notable blue gems, including the reflection nebula NGC6914, add substantially to the beauty of this image

This is a Sky 90 image taken using the old SXV-H9C camera.  This image represents approximately 4 hours of RGB data using 3 minute subs and 4 hours of H-alpha using 6 minute subs.  Just one tiny mistake in the description – Sadr isn’t in the image :)

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No matter how many publications you have, a new publication is always exciting.  The July 2007 issue of Sky at Night magazine is including our widefield M42 image on the cover CD-ROM.  This image was taken with the Sky 90/SXVF-M25C combination.

This is one of my top ten favourite images and shows just how far really have come in two years (and maybe just how far we have to go!).

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Tom How over at Curdridge Observatory dropped me a note to say that he has just finished some interesting work with our image of M81 [Bode's Nebula].  We produced our single frame Hyperstar image with the SXV-H9C one-shot colour cmaera which gave us a reasonably large field of view (FOV) of one degree by three-quarters of a degree.

Once again they have used our image as a chrominance layer with their own image as a luminance layer and once again the result looks great. 

Make sure you take a look at the original M81 Bodes Nebula Image by Tom How at Curdridge Observatory.  Tom’s image is on the left and our image is on the right.

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Managed to get some good imaging time with the Sky-90 and SXV-H9C combination – the result is this image of M29 “The Cooling Tower”.

Only 13 sub-exposures at 3-minutes per sub using the Sky 90 and SXV-H9C camera.

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